Best of the Web

A moving story of a student who didn't forget a caring teacher, why parents should volunteer, and advice on parenting an adolescent - our selection of thought-provoking and useful articles from around the web on educating and raising children.

A friendship that lasted a lifetime

(Martin Flanagan, The Age)

The author’s father was a teacher in a Tasmanian country school in the 1930s. Among his students was Edna, whose education had suffered. The teacher saw Edna’s promise and gave her extra time. Edna never forgot, and a lifelong friendship ensued. Flanagan beautifully tells a story that unfolded over several decades and a world war.

An open letter to all the non-volunteering mums and dads

(Collette Beck, Essential Kids)

This open letter to the non-volunteers is written on behalf of all the parent volunteers who make children’s sport, kinder programs and school communities great. ‘I just ask one thing of you,’ the author. ‘Stop being so apathetic.’ There’s a list of the benefits for kids when parents volunteer – better results at school, better self-esteem, and there are the many benefits for parents – better engagement with your child, more confident parenting.

Parenting an Adolescent: 11 Insights That Will Make a Difference

(Karen Young, Hey Sigmund)

For parents navigating the teen years, any advice from someone who has been there is welcomed. The author has a child moving out of adolescence, which she describes as a brilliant, trying, beautiful, crazy adventure. But there is another child about to begin the adventure. The article offers some common sense advice – including separating them from their behaviour.

Should emotions be taught in schools?

(Grace Rubenstein, ideas.ted.com)

An interesting piece from the people at Ted, which looks at the views of researchers who believe that emotional skills should rank as high in importance in children’s educations as maths, reading, history and science. It looks at why emotions matter, how children are often taught to ignore or cover over their emotion, and how you can teach emotions.

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